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Deadline for abstracts 31 July 2015 More details here Future solutions for a food secure world The challenges ahead to feed 9 billion people by 2050 are well articulated (and contested), but innovative solutions remain elusive and time is of the essence. One possible reason that solutions are slow to surface is the generally homogenous pool of ideas from which to draw inspiration: neoliberal and patriarchal ideologies continue to dominate the discourse on global solutions. A platform for diverse perspectives on these problems and for proposals of solutions, can identify potential solution pathways that are key to operationalizing timely strategies for a just and sustainable food future. In this Special Issue of Solutions, young thinkers (under 40 years of age) from around the globe are invited to propose innovative solutions for a food secure world. The Special Issue will provide a platform for emerging scholars to contribute to solutions from their diverse geo-cultural and disciplinary backgrounds. Papers on any topic relating to food secure futures are welcome, including, but not limited to: agriculture, aquaculture, climate change, consumption, energy and biofuels, fisheries, indigenous food systems, labour and migration, pastoralism, and urban food systems. The final contributions will take the form of “perspectives”: short essays (1,250-2,000 words) on new points of view from thinkers working on bold solutions. Final selection criteria will be based on a combination of quality, innovation, gender balance, and geo-cultural diversity.
MafiaOrganized crime is a continuously evolving phenomenon.  The United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (2000) defined  “organized criminal group” as a structured group of three or more persons, existing for a period of time and acting in concert with the aim of committing one or more serious crimes or offenses […] in order to obtain, directly or indirectly, a financial or other material benefit. (United Nations, 2000). Typically organized crime groups profit and thrive through the manipulation and monopolization of legitimate markets, institutions, and industries – e.g. financial markets, labour unions, and construction or sanitation (UNODC, 2014) as well as through black markets and illegitimate practices – e.g. illicit drug trade and human trafficking. They rely on tools of violence, corruption, bribes, graft, extortion, intimidation, and murder to maintain their respective operations and control their market profits (Costa, 2010). With high market stakes and violence-based operations, criminal organizations remain the primary cause of violent deaths in several countries (Campana, 2013; UNODC, 2014), including regions of South and Eastern Europe (Varese, 2006; 2013; UNODC, 2014) are the main cause of violent deaths in several countries. Beyond physical violence, distortionary participation in legitimate markets and pervasive participation in illicit markets combined with the varied socio-political and geographical scales at which organized crime groups can operate at, both regionally and globally, results in the estimated annual global economic impact of organized crime to be in the range of 1 trillion US dollars (Costa, 2010; UNODC, 2015).

One of the absolute pleasures and benefits of working at Wageningen University is the opportunity to collaborate with some excellent and passionate scholars. In order to make good use of this situation,...

A new blog is out by Oxfam America's director of policy and research, Gawain Kripke. In the post he reflects on t the negotiations around new sustainable development goals,  how these goals...

A new issue of Urban Agriculture Magazine no. 29, which is a special issue on city region food systems. This issue addresses the growing attention for policy and practice approaches that focus on...