SEPT 27 Colloquium: Challenges of the 2030 Agenda for science and knowledge for food systems

In 2015 the international community achieved a new milestone with the adoption of the 2030 Agenda and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). SDG 2 focuses explicitly on food and nutrition security, while other SDGs address further relevant aspects of agriculture and food systems.

Against the background of this renewed global commitment to sustainable food security and nutrition, the HLPE has co-organized with the University of Hohenheim (Stuttgart) an International Colloquium inviting scientists and experts from public institutions, civil society and the private sector to discuss the challenges that the 2030 Agenda implies for science and knowledge with regard to food systems. The Results of this dialogue will contribute to the upcoming global consultation process for the identification of “Critical and Emerging Issues for Food Security and Nutrition”.

The colloquium will take place in Stuttgart, 27 September 2016, starting at 10.00 CEST (8.00 a.m. UTC).

The event will be webcast and can be followed live at this link (Silverlight must be installed)

 

 

Global food crisis brought lasting changes to the food people eat

precarious-lives

 

Last week, IDS and Oxfam released a new report: Precarious Lives: Food, Work and Care After the Global Food Crisis

The report found that the global food crisis of 2007-11 changed the relationship between the work people do and the food they eat. The report notes that the costs of these changed relationships have gone uncounted by global policymakers.

 

 

 

Continue reading “Global food crisis brought lasting changes to the food people eat”

Health and climate change: policy responses to protect public health

A long awaited report from the Lancet / UCL Commission on Climate Change and Health has just been published called “Health and climate change: policy responses to protect public health”

You need to register to The Lancet to access the report but registration is currently free.

There are quite a few references to food security, including this statement challenging assumptions around sustainable intensification:

Panel 4: Food security, climate change, and human health

The provision for global food demand by 2050 cannot assume improved crop yields through sustainable agricultural intensification because of the negative effects on crop growth from an increased frequency of weather extremes. Multifunctional food production systems will prove important in a warmer world. These systems are managed for benefi ts beyond yield, and provide multiple ecosystem services, support biodiversity, improve nutrition, and can enhance resilience to shocks such as crop failure or pest outbreaks (p 16).

There is also a supplementary video “How can we transform climate change from a threat to an opportunity to improve global health?”

The Guardian has also reported on the report with an article: Climate change threatens 50 years of progress in global health, study says

Happy reading!